Gold in the BankOur homes contain almost everything of value to us. In a way, your home is like a giant safe that you want to protect from break-ins, floods and fires. Unfortunately, you can’t always be one-hundred percent sure that everything in your home is protected from these hazards.

For an added layer of security for your most important belongings, buying a home safe is an excellent option. However, there are many different types of safes across a large price range. Knowing which one fits your needs but also your budget can be complicated. What’s more, deciding what items you own should be kept in a safe is a process all of its own. But we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ll talk about the types of safes and some items you should keep inside of them.

Safe Categories

Not all safes are created with the same purpose. Some may be designed for you to be able to open from your smart phone, whereas others are created from an everyday object, such as a book, to be hidden in plain sight. Others might be small and fireproof but not very effective against burglars who can easily carry them out of your home.

When shopping a safe and thinking about size, remember that you should probably buy a safe that is a bit larger than your current needs since you will probably someday add items to your safe.  

Here are the main types of safe to help you choose which one is right for you:

  • Water-tight and fire resistant. If you have important documents, jewelry, or electronics that you want to keep secure, a weatherproof safe is the way to go. For added security against floods, keep the safe away from areas that are prone to water damage like basements. These are the most common safes and are a great choice.
  • Diversion. Diversion safes often only have minimal security measures (locks), if any at all. Their main strength is that they can be hidden in plain sight, such as being a book inside a bookshelf.
  • Wall-installed. You’ve probably seen this type in the movies. They are installed into a wall and can be hidden behind objects. These have the advantage of being hidden like a diversion safe, but also use thick metal and complex locking mechanisms. But be prepared to pay a hefty price for all those features.
  • Anti-burglary. These safes are very difficult to break open. They have complex locks and thick metal with few vulnerabilities.
  • Object-specific safe. Some safes are designed just for weapons, others designed just for jewelry.

What to keep safe

Generally speaking, anything of value to you that isn’t easy to replace can be kept in a safe. Depending on how easy it is to access your safe and how often you use the item, you may decide it’s simpler to leave the item out of the safe. However, you can always use the safe to secure backups of documents and files. Here are some ideas for items to keep in your safe:

  • Passports
  • Birth Certificates
  • Social security card
  • Spare keys
  •  Wills
  • Flash drive containing important photos and documents
  • Important passwords
  • Jewelry
  • Family heirlooms
  • Weapons and other dangerous objects

 

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Selling a house is a stressful experience. You have to look at your home with the eyes of a potential buyer and, when you do, all those nicks, stains, scratches and worn finishes become glaringly obvious. The same thing happens when you look around your yard: all those flaws you’ve managed to ignore all these years suddenly become visible.

There are many things you can do–with or without professional help–to fix up your property and get it ready for sale. Most people focus on the house
itself; after all, freshly painted walls and steam cleaned carpets do make a big difference. But there’s one area that’s often overlooked–one that can
make a big difference not only in attracting potential buyers but also in sales value. “Curb appeal”: you’ve probably heard the phrase before. But what exactly is it and what can you do to achieve it?

Curb appeal is evident in that first glance at your property: does it look well-kept, is it attractive, does it look like someplace your prospective buyer would like to call home? The first step is to take a walk around your property, looking at it as if you were a stranger. It can be very helpful to have your realtor take this inventory with you–a trained eye can make a big difference.

Look for the obvious things first: bald spots in your lawn, overgrown shrubs, cracked steps, dandelions, piles of leaves and sticks. Make a list of everything you see. It may seem overwhelming and you may not have the means to take care of everything, but prioritizing will help. If you can afford professional help, all the better; if you can’t, there are things you can do yourself to improve the appearance of your property.

The following list will help:

• Start with general yard clean-up: remove any branches, piles of leaves or dead plants. If you have a dog, make sure there are no “land mines” on the property.

• Reseed and fertilize your lawn; make sure it’s kept mown and watered at all times while you’re trying to sell. Take an edger and neaten up where the grass meets walkways and foundation. If you have areas of dead grass, consider treating for grubs. And, get rid of those dandelions!

• Trim overgrown shrubs, especially those close to your house. If you don’t have any shrubs, consider buying a few. Even a small evergreen on either side of the front door can make a welcoming difference.

• If you have flower beds, make sure they’re free of weeds. Renew or add a layer of mulch around flowers, shrubs and any trees you have in your yard. Not only does mulch keep weeds down and help retain moisture in the soil, it makes the beds look neater. mulch comes in different colors: choose one that will complement your flowers and your house. If your yard slopes, a low stone retaining wall will not only hold the soil (and flowers) in place, but it will also make the bed look neater.

• What about the approach to your house–do you have a walkway? If you do, it may need replacing. If you don’t, now is the time to add one; even a few simple pavers between the driveway and the front door can make a difference. If you don’t have a railing on your front steps, consider adding one. Make sure your front door is clean and in good shape.

• Do you have a driveway? If you have asphalt, look for cracks and oil stains. If you have dirt, consider laying down some gravel or pea stone.

• Fencing can make a big difference in your home’s salability. People with young children or dogs will most likely want one for safety’s sake. Privacy is another reason for fencing; it doesn’t have to be a stockade fence–a few fast-growing evergreens like arborvitae can make a big difference. Aesthetics is another reason to edge your property. If your home is in a rural area, you may already–like many homeowners in New England–have a stone wall around your property. If so, check it for loose or fallen rocks.

• If you don’t have any perennial flower beds, consider planting some annuals. Flats of bright, long-lasting blooms like marigolds and impatiens are inexpensive and add to your yard’s beauty. As with any plants, consider the growing zone in which you live. If you’re purchasing shrubs or perennials, choose ones that are hardy and require little maintenance. If the soil has a high clay concentration, loosen it up and enrich it by mixing in some loam.

• If you have a deck, you may need to power wash and re-stain or paint it. Check for loose support beams; sand any areas that feel rough and might produce splinters. If you have a patio, make sure it is free of weeds and cracks. Consider replacing a cement patio with slate or brick which not only look nicer but are easier to replace.

• Check your outdoor lighting; replace the bulbs, remove any dead insects. If you don’t have any, consider adding some. If you can’t afford wiring, solar-battery stake lights are inexpensive. If your mailbox is battered or wobbly, replace it.

It sounds like a lot to consider and there’s no denying that selling your home can be a difficult thing on more than one level. You want the highest price you can get, however, and these things that add curb appeal will increase your home’s value and can make the difference between someone who makes an appointment to look at your home and someone who drives by and keeps on going.

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